Wir bringen Licht in das Dunkel

Wir bringen Licht in das Dunkel zu dem umfassenden Thema der ab 2025 für börsennotierte Unternehmen verpflichtenden Aktionärsidentifikation und Übermittlung der Investorendaten an das Bundeszentralamt für Steuern.

Wenn Sie Fragen zum 𝗠𝗶𝗞𝗮𝗗𝗶𝘃 (Mitteilungsverfahren Kapitalertragsteuer auf Dividenden und Hinterlegungsscheine) -> "Im Übrigen sind inländische börsennotierte Gesellschaften verpflichtet, die Eigentümer ihrer Aktien (Vorzugs- oder Stammaktien) an das BZSt zu melden." und 𝗘𝗶𝗻𝗸𝗼𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘀𝘁𝗲𝘂𝗲𝗿𝗴𝗲𝘀𝗲𝘁𝘇 (𝗘𝗦𝘁𝗚)§ 𝟰𝟱𝗯 𝗔𝗻𝗴𝗮𝗯𝗲𝗻 𝘇𝘂𝗿 𝗕𝗲𝘀𝗰𝗵𝗲𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗴𝘂𝗻𝗴 𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝗔𝗯𝗳ü𝗵𝗿𝘂𝗻𝗴 𝗱𝗲𝗿 𝗞𝗮𝗽𝗶𝘁𝗮𝗹𝗲𝗿𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗴𝘀𝘁𝗲𝘂𝗲𝗿 -> (9) Inländische börsennotierte Gesellschaften haben gemäß § 67d des Aktiengesetzes Informationen über die Identität ihrer Aktionäre zum Zeitpunkt ihres Gewinnverteilungsbeschlusses zu verlangen und die ihnen übermittelten Informationen elektronisch nach Maßgabe des § 93c der Abgabenordnung unverzüglich elektronisch an das Bundeszentralamt für Steuern zu übermitteln. haben, dann sprechen Sie gerne direkt unseren Geschäftsführer Götz Dickert an.

Götz Dickert ist Experte im Bereich Aktionärsidentifikation/Aktienregistersysteme/Investorenanalysen und Mitglied in der Arbeitsgruppe des 𝗠𝗶𝗞𝗮𝗗𝗶𝘃 wo es um die organisatorische und technische Umsetzung der gesetzlichen Vorgabe geht.

Sie erreichen Götz Dickert unter der 0611 71186840 oder per Email goetz.dickert@captrace.com

CAPTRACE is funded by the State of Hessen/Germany

 

 

 


Do you know your shareholders or do you like surprises at the AGM?

Do you know your shareholders or do you like surprises at the AGM?

SRD II facilitates shareholder identification.

A chore or a unique opportunity for dialogue with shareholders - the approach to the AGM is as varied as the range of listed companies. What they all have in common is the need for extremely thorough preparation of the annual shareholders' meeting. A precise analysis of the shareholder structure is the basis for this. Thanks to the Shareholder Rights Directive II, this can now be done much more quickly and cheaply.

For most listed companies with bearer shares, the annual general meeting used to be the only opportunity in the year to get in touch with all their shareholders. However, in the past this was only done indirectly, via the custodian banks. They only found out who actually owned the company's shares when the shareholders responded to the invitation and registered for the AGM or cast their votes. Depending on attendance, a more or less vague picture of the ownership structure emerged.

Those who wanted to know at other times or more precisely had to conduct a shareholder survey or "Share ID". So far, the results were often not really satisfactory. The information was usually slow in coming in, if it came in at all. There was neither an obligation for banks to respond nor a requirement to do so within a certain time. The effort was high for all involved, as were the costs. The result, however, was only meaningful to a limited extent - simply due to the fact that the data collection could be spread over several weeks. Apart from the names of institutional shareholders and the number of shares they hold, not much could be learned.

So it is hardly surprising that few companies in this country conducted a regular survey. Those who commissioned a "Share ID" usually had a special reason. Such an occasion is typically the upcoming AGM - i.e. the very event at which information about shareholders is received anyway. Why? Because in the case of critical AGM resolutions, important shareholders are to be picked up in advance and majorities are to be organised. In this case, it makes sense to prepare the ground in advance of the publication of the agenda. The companies that will hold their shareholders' meeting in the second quarter of 2023 are now exactly in this phase.

Governance roadshows - the answer to the trend towards increasing investor influence

But it is not only critical or activist investors who demand a more intensive dialogue. More and more institutional investors are focusing on the aspects of their investments that go beyond monetary returns. This has led to an increasing number of votes on important governance issues. Recently, there has also been an increase in influencing board elections or investors initiating discussions on environmental impact, sustainable business practices or diversity.

As institutional investors seek a more active "stewardship role", IR departments should also be more attuned to the governance experts among their investors. This is definitely a new direction; in the past, IR teams focused almost exclusively on the portfolio managers and analysts who made the buy/sell decisions. Intensive engagement with their own shareholder base and knowledge of their objectives in terms of environmental, social and governance ("ESG") aspects is the basis. In turn, knowledge of the shareholder structure is a prerequisite for this.

Faster and cheaper access to better data

The regulations of the Shareholder Rights Directive II (SRD II), which came into force at the beginning of September 2020, now create completely new prerequisites for shareholder surveys - but so far only for issuers listed in regulated markets. For them, the simple formula now applies: Faster, cheaper and better data. All parties involved are obliged to forward information electronically under strict time limits - usually on the same day. As a result, the processing time has been halved from six to eight weeks in the past to two to three weeks now. A further reduction to one to two weeks is the goal. Disclosure rates of 95 to 99 percent of the capital will be achieved. The new regulation also covers financial intermediaries based outside the EU, e.g. Switzerland, Liechtenstein or the USA, if they hold shares of affected companies in custody for their clients.

The effort required has also been significantly reduced compared to the manual collection of data as in pre-SRD II times - and thus also the costs, by at least half. This is good, because companies can now afford to have their shareholders surveyed at shorter intervals, which makes the data more meaningful through status comparisons.

In addition to the names of their investors and information on their holdings, issuers now also receive the complete address, and in the case of private investors even the date of birth, if applicable. From institutional custodians, the issuer learns the Legal Entity Identifier designation and can thus allocate the holdings down to individual funds. This opens up new perspectives for IR work and enables more intensive communication, whether with fund managers or private investors. And there are said to be companies that don't see the AGM as an annoying compulsory event, but organise it as an event that involves the shareholders in the company's development in order to bind them to the company.

Götz Dickert, Managing Director Captrace GmbH

CAPTRACE is funded by the State of Hessen/Germany

 

 

 


Acceso durante todo el año a todos los datos de los inversores a través de C◆TRACE:

C TRACE
Acceso durante todo el año a todos los datos de los inversores a través de C◆TRACE:
Importación de datos adicionales, como las cotizaciones.
"Alertas" para el seguimiento de los cambios y las novedades, conspicuas a través del correo electrónico y la app.
Posibilidad de identificar y actualizar automáticamente a los accionistas mediante "Alertas".
Registro de contactos y reuniones con inversores. Función CRM
Carga de datos de la AGM. Quiénes asistieron a la Junta General de Accionistas y cómo votaron
Portal del inversor, para el acceso de los inversores a sus datos. Por ejemplo, para mostrar al inversor cómo ejercer sus derechos de voto.

Póngase en contacto con nosotros para obtener más información:

monica.rodriguez-pusch@captrace.com
Tel. +49 611711868-47

CAPTRACE GmbH
Äppelallee 27
65203 Wiesbaden

 

 

CAPTRACE is funded by the State of Hessen/Germany

 

 

 

 


𝗦𝗪𝗜𝗙𝗧: 𝗞𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝗸𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝟰.𝟬

Auf Basis der „Shareholder Rights Directive“ sollen Investoren auf einfachem elektronischem Wege die Stimmrechte aus ­ihrem Aktienbesitz grenzübergreifend wahrnehmen können sowie Emittenten auf dieser Basis Kenntnis darüber erlangen, welcher Investor wie viele Aktien hält.

Und ausgerechnet ein System aus den 1970er-Jahren, das Interbankensystem SWIFT, bietet alle Voraussetzungen für die Durchführung der Direktive.

𝗟𝗲𝘀𝗲𝗻 𝗦𝗶𝗲 𝗵𝗶𝗲𝗿 𝗸𝗼𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗻𝗳𝗿𝗲𝗶 𝗱𝗲𝗻 𝗸𝗼𝗺𝗽𝗹𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗻 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗸𝗲𝗹:
https://lnkd.in/ejxqYggp

 


 

CAPTRACE wird gefördert vom Land Hessen

 

 

 

 


After KYC comes KYS - Why it is becoming more important for companies to know where their shareholders are located

After KYC comes KYS - Why it is becoming more important for companies to know where their shareholders are located

Admittedly, not many companies have such prominent shareholders as Chelsea FC. Oligarch Roman Abramovich had the foresight to transfer his shares to a trustee before his ownership became an (even bigger) problem for the London football club. Allegedly an affair of the heart for him. That even companies whose shareholder structure is not quite the focus of public interest could suddenly have "an issue" could be seen last week with the German travel company TUI.

In both cases, the shareholders from Russian oligarch circles were known to the company and the public. And in both cases there were not only financial but also strategic links to investors who are now on sanctions lists in Europe and the USA - which more or less became a burden for both companies.

Now it is in the nature of things that as a publicly listed company you cannot choose your shareholders, or only to a certain extent. Why then, and for which companies, is it important to know who the shareholders are and where they come from?

KYC - It is standard in the financial sector

For banks and insurance companies, goods traders or real estate agents, the know-your-customer principle (KYC for short) should have been standard practice since 2008. The Money Laundering Act (GWG) was rewritten at that time to more effectively prevent the covert smuggling of illegally acquired assets into the legal economic cycle. This does not always and everywhere work as desired by law and society. If shortcomings come to light, this is not only punishable by law. It is also a considerable reputational risk - not only for the companies, but also for the people involved. In the financial sector, the abbreviation KYC is therefore also translated as "Kill your Career".

Comprehensive risk analysis

Based on the applicable EU regulations and according to the Foreign Trade and Payments Act (Außenwirtschaftsgesetz, AWG), companies are obliged to make an economically and technically reasonable effort to check all business partners against the published European Common Foreign & Security Policy (CFSP) list. This means that not only exporting companies, but also companies that only do business in Germany, must check all business partners, suppliers, customers and also employees against the sanctions list. This regularly includes financial relationships. These lists refer not only to Russia, but also to Iran, North Korea and South Sudan, for example. Even the USA was once on the European Union's sanctions list. An overview of the currently applicable measures and affected countries can be found on the EU Sanctions Map.

In particular, anyone who maintains business relations with countries on the sanctions list (or with persons who come from the respective countries) would be well advised to obtain a comprehensive picture of their relations with such regions.

In the last three weeks, we have all had to learn painfully that the signs can change quickly. What yesterday was still part of an international growth strategy, was considered a good and reliable partner or, as in the case of TUI a year ago, was celebrated as a rescue, can become a burden tomorrow. In the age of social networks and "naming and shaming", issues can develop great momentum very quickly. It is better if corporate communication is prepared for such cases and is not caught cold.

Apart from possible reputational risks, it is advantageous to know whether shares in one's own company could be blocked due to sanctions or, conversely, whether increased sales from regions affected by sanctions are to be expected. Companies should also be prepared for questions from investors as to whether they know who their shareholders are. There is nothing wrong with having more to offer than a shrug of the shoulders. In the case of financial companies, by the way, such questions can also come from BAFIN - the financial supervisory authority can investigate who is invested in a so-called owner control procedure.

The greatest risks lie in ignorance of facts. Knowing who one's shareholders are is therefore part of risk management.

 


 

CAPTRACE wird gefördert vom Land Hessen

 

 

 

 


Una identificación precisa de los accionistas es la base de la estrategia de relaciones públicas de una empresa.

Una identificación precisa de los accionistas es la base de la estrategia de relaciones públicas de una empresa.

Saber qué inversores están comprando o vendiendo, la identificación y el seguimiento de los activistas, la detección de oportunidades para dirigirse a ellos por región o institución, etc., son aspectos cruciales para que los equipos de RRII sean eficientes y se centren en relacionarse de forma proactiva con sus inversores.

Póngase en contacto con nosotros para obtener más información:

monica.rodriguez-pusch@captrace.com
Tel. +49 611711868-47

CAPTRACE GmbH
Äppelallee 27
65203 Wiesbaden

 

 

CAPTRACE is funded by the State of Hessen/Germany

 

 

 

 


You don't know your shareholders yet? We can change that!

Over 100 SRD2 share IDs already carried out.

CAPTRACE sheds light on your shareholder structure. With the Share-ID, we identify over 90%* of your investors within five banking days.

Transparency is becoming more important throughout our society – whether that be the actions of employees, the origin and production of products and cash flow or a company’s investor structure.

With our software solutions and services, we help companies find out who their shareholders are. This makes communication with investors faster, easier and better.

 

#SRD2 #Share-ID #ShareRegistry #Cap-Table #CTrace

 

* In 99% of the Share IDs conducted by CAPTRACE, more than 90% of the shareholders were identified, and in 90% of the surveys, more than 98% were identified

 

 

 

CAPTRACE is funded by the State of Hessen/Germany

 

 

 

 


Aktionärsidentifikation nach SRD 2 | Banken erheben Gebühren

Banken erheben Gebühren

Verunsicherung herrscht im Markt teilweise bezüglich der Kosten, die von den Banken für die Erheben und Ermitteln von Aktionärsdaten erhoben werden. Einen guten Anhaltspunkt, was angemessen ist, bietet die Verordnung über den Ersatz von Aufwendungen der Kreditinstitute (KredInstAufwV), die Bezug auf das Führen eines Aktionärsregisters bei Namensaktien nimmt. Demnach sind die Kosten für einen elektronisch ermittelten Datensatz mit 0,08 Euro anzusetzen. Teilweise haben Banken nun höhere Gebühren in Rechnung gestellt. Mit Verweis auf die gesetzlich festgelegten Beträge sind die Unternehmen jedoch in einer guten Verhandlungsposition, überhöhten Rechnungen zu widersprechen.

Es ist wohl davon auszugehen, dass dieser offene Punkt im Rahmen der verpflichtenden Übermittlung der Aktionärsdaten ab 2025 durch eine eindeutige Regelung geschlossen wird. Aufgrund der automatisierten Abläufe ist mit einem weiteren Absenken des Preises zu rechnen. Das ist genauso ein Pluspunkt auf dem Konto des Aktionärszensus wie die Aussicht, die im Freiverkehr gelisteten Unternehmen künftig auch gesetzlich verbrieftes Anrecht auf Auskunft erhalten. Diese werden von ARUG II bislang nämlich noch nicht erfasst.


Juni 2022 – CAPTRACE – Gastbeitrag Going Public Magazin

 

 

 

CAPTRACE wird gefördert vom Land Hessen

 

 

 

 


Die Pflicht zur Aktionärserhebung kommt

Es hat sich mittlerweile herumgesprochen: Die Frage, wer die Aktionäre eines Unternehmens sind, lässt sich heute von im regulierten Markt gelisteten Emittenten recht fix mit einer Share-ID klären. Aber wer möchte das eigentlich wissen? Viele Unternehmen, aber nicht nur diese: Dass zu den Interessenten auch der Fiskus gehört, dürfte bislang weniger bekannt sein – genauso wenig wie der Umstand, dass die Aktionärserhebung für viele Unternehmen bald schon zur jährlichen Pflichtübung wird.


Juni 2022 – CAPTRACE – Gastbeitrag Going Public Magazin

 

 

 

CAPTRACE wird gefördert vom Land Hessen

 

 

 

 


Nach KYC kommt KYS – Warum es für Unternehmen wichtiger wird zu wissen, wo ihre Aktionäre sitzen

Nach KYC kommt KYS – Warum es für Unternehmen wichtiger wird zu wissen, wo ihre Aktionäre sitzen

Zugegeben, nicht viele Unternehmen haben so prominente Aktionäre wie der FC Chelsea. Der Oligarch Roman Abramovich hat seine Anteile vorausschauend einem Treuhänder übertragen, bevor seine Eignerschaft zum (noch größeren) Problem für den Londoner Fußballclub wurde. Für ihn angeblich eine Herzensangelegenheit. Dass auch Unternehmen, deren Aktionärsstruktur nicht ganz so Fokus des öffentlichen Interesses stehen, plötzlich  „ein Thema” haben könnten, ließ sich vergangene Woche beim deutschen Reisekonzern TUI verfolgen.

In beiden Fällen waren die Aktionäre aus russischen Oligarchen-Kreisen dem Unternehmen und der Öffentlichkeit bekannt. Und in beiden Fällen gab es nicht nur finanzielle, sondern auch strategische Verbindung zu Investoren, die nun auf Sanktionslisten in Europa und den USA stehen – was für beide Gesellschaften mehr oder weniger zur Belastung wurde.

Nun liegt es in der Natur der Sache, dass man sich seine Aktionäre als öffentlich notiertes Unternehmen nicht oder nur bis zu einem bestimmten Grad aussuchen kann. Warum und für welche Unternehmen ist es dann wichtig zu wissen, wer die Aktionäre sind und woher sie kommen?

KYC – In der Finanzbranche ist es Standard

Für Banken und Versicherungen, Güterhändler oder Immobilienmakler sollte das Know-your-Customer-Prinzip (kurz: KYC – englisch für „Lerne Deinen Kunden kennen“) bereits seit 2008 zum Standard gehören. Das Geldwäschegesetz (GWG) wurde damals neu gefasst, um das verdeckte Einschleusen von illegal erworbenen Vermögenswerten in den legalen Wirtschaftskreislauf effektiver zu verhindern. Nicht immer und überall funktioniert das so, wie gesetzlich und gesellschaftlich gewünscht. Kommen Mängel ans Licht, ist das nicht nur strafbewehrt. Es ist auch ein erhebliches Reputationsrisiko – und das nicht nur für die Unternehmen, sondern auch für die involvierten Personen. In der Finanzbranche wird die Abkürzung KYC daher auch mit „Kill your Career“ übersetzt.

Umfassende Risikoanalyse 

Unternehmen sind aufgrund der geltenden EU-Verordnungen und gemäß Außenwirtschaftsgesetz (AWG) verpflichtet, einen wirtschaftlich und technisch vertretbaren Aufwand zu betreiben, alle Geschäftspartner gegen die veröffentlichte europäische Liste Common Foreign & Security Policy (CFSP) zu prüfen. Das bedeutet, dass nicht nur exportierende Unternehmen, sondern auch Unternehmen die nur in Deutschland Geschäfte machen, alle Geschäftspartner, Lieferanten, Kunden und auch die Mitarbeiter gegen die Sanktionsliste prüfen müssen. Darunter fallen regelmäßig auch finanzielle Beziehungen. Diese Listen beziehen sich nicht nur auf Russland, sondern bspw. auch auf Iran, Nordkorea, Südsudan. Selbst die USA stand bereits einmal auf der Sanktionsliste der Europäischen Union. Eine Übersicht der aktuell geltenden Maßnahmen und betroffenen Länder findet sich auf der EU Sanctions Map.

Insbesondere wer geschäftliche Beziehungen zu Ländern auf der Sanktionsliste pflegt (oder zu Personen, die aus den jeweiligen Ländern kommen), ist gut beraten, sich ein umfassendes Bild seiner Beziehung in solche Regionen zu verschaffen. 

Das sich Vorzeichen schnell ändern können, mussten wir alle in den letzten drei Wochen schmerzhaft erfahren. Das, was gestern noch als Teil einer internationalen Wachstumsstrategie war, als guter und zuverlässiger Partner galt oder wie im Fall von TUI  vor einem Jahr noch als Rettung gefeiert wurde, kann morgen schon zur Belastung werden. Im Zeitalter sozialer Netzwerke und des “Naming und Shaming” können Themen sehr schnell eine große Dynamik entwickeln. Besser ist es, wenn die Unternehmenskommunikation auf solche Fälle vorbereitet ist und nicht kalt erwischt wird.

Abgesehen von möglichen Reputationsrisiken ist es von Vorteil zu wissen, ob Aktien des eigenen Unternehmens aufgrund von Sanktionen blockiert sein könnten oder umgekehrt mit vermehrten Verkäufen aus von Sanktionen betroffenen Regionen zu rechnen ist. Auch sollten Unternehmen durchaus auf Fragen von Investoren vorbereitet sein, ob sie wissen, wer ihre Aktionäre sind. Da ist es nicht verkehrt, wenn man mehr zu bieten hat, als ein Schulterzucken. Bei Finanzunternehmen können solche Fragen übrigens auch von der BAFin kommen – die Finanzaufsicht kann in einem sogenannten Inhaberkontrollverfahren untersuchen, wer investiert ist.

Die größten Risiken liegen in der Unkenntnis von Sachverhalten. Zu wissen, wer seine Aktionäre sind, gehört daher zum Risikomanagement.


 

CAPTRACE wird gefördert vom Land Hessen